Motivation Direction

Many successful golf players (and business leaders) are motivated by their own dissatisfaction with their performance. It can be a very powerful motivator. You would expect someone who is thus motivated to improve their game to be similarly motivated in other aspects of their life. Do you see a golf course as a series of […]

In today's world of 9-second attention spans, our introductions mean more-than-ever before. Sally Hogshead reveals the seven triggers of fascination and how to get others to fall in love with your ideas, instantly.

What’s Better Today? How to Grow and Learn into the Leader You Can Be

What’s Better Today? How to Grow and Learn into the Leader You Can Be. (Singapore: Corporate Edge Asia Pte Ltd, 2013)

Leadership Coaching is an essential tool for anyone who wants to learn and grow as a leader, improve their business leadership coaching skills or to learn to coach. Written by a top leadership coach trainer, “What's Better Today? How to Grow and Learn into the Leader You Can Be” is filled with practical coaching tools and template exercises that bring professional coaching techniques within your grasp.

This book helps and guides you in getting the most our of your own coach and coaching because, for most people, being coached is a new experience.

  • In Part One, “Starting Out” – you will learn if you are ready to be coached and establishing your coaching objectives, and if so, what coaching style will work best for you right now and thus how you can go about choosing a coach to work with.
  • In Part Two, “Grow and Learn” – you’ll learn how to get the very most you can out of your coaching program. Including a structured growth framework with easy to use templates that you can use to both shortcut your coaching and get the results you want as quickly as you want.
  • Part Three, is about “Wrapping Up” your coaching effectively so that you, and your coach, continue to learn from the experience.

Leadership coaching is a great introduction to a powerful way of helping others grow.

I was directed to this book by a friend who knew I had had a less than satisfactory experience with a coach. This book clearly and concisely gave me all the information I wish I had had earlier. I would recommend this book for anyone thinking about taking on the commitment required to have a coach – and for coaches to see what is really expected of them!Neil Davidson

Is Mindfulness a Key Practice That Every Business Leader Should Appreciate and Use? | ReadyToManage

It’s not all zen. Mindfulness as a subject seems to have been everywhere in the media in recent times and not only as a subject which has been described as a key part of traditional Buddhist practice. Today mindfulness is described as being a much more general approach that we can all take in our […]

How to introduce 360 Appraisals – How to – 3D HR

#appraisal schemes are an essential part of any business, as a means of measuring how people are performing in their roles in the work-place.  The appraisal scheme may not be formalised and happen in an ad-hoc, unsystematic way.  Often that means someone is only told about their performance when they get things wrong – good performance […]

360 appraisal

8 Subconscious Mistakes Our Brains Make Every Day–And How To Avoid Them | Fast Company | Business + Innovation

If you really think you are in charge of you, then why are you doing these? Get ready to have your mind blown. I was seriously shocked at some of these mistakes in thinking that I subconsciously make all the time. Obviously, none of them are huge, life-threatening mistakes, but they are really surprising and […]

Stress and Anxiety hold us back from achieving all that we can – to win this war, we need to understand just what is happening inside our brains and then we can go beyond coping and choose to lead our lives towards good success.

your brain on stress and anxiety infographic

Stress and Anxiety in your – inforgraphic. Click to get the full image to download

Stress is the way our bodies and minds react to something which upsets our normal balance in life. Stress is how we feel and how our bodies react when we are fearful or anxious. Some level of stress has some upside to mind and body function to enable us to react in a positive way. Too much stress though, is both harmful to the body and our performance. How much is too much? Well, that depends… on you and how you respond.

It is essential to know how our brain responds to the stimuli which trigger an anxiety response so that you are equipped to deal appropriately with anxiety.

Let me highlight the key areas of your brain that are involved, and then I will explain what happens inside the brain.

The Thalamus is the central hub for sights and sounds. The thalamus breaks down incoming visual cues by size, shape and colour, and auditory cues by volume and dissonance, and then signals the cortex.

The cortex then gives raw sights and sounds meaning enabling you to be conscious of what you are seeing and hearing. And I'll mention here that the prefrontal cortex is vital to turning off the anxiety response once the threat has passed.

The amygdala is the emotional core of the brain whose primary role is to trigger the fear response. Information passing through the amygdala is associated with an emotional significance.

The bed nucleus of the stria terminals is particularly interesting when we discuss anxiety. While the amygdala sets off an immediate burst of fear whilst the BNST perpetuates the fear response, causing longer term unease typical of anxiety.

The locus ceruleus receives signals from the amygdala and initiates the classic anxiety response: rapid heartbeat, increased blood pressure, sweating and pupil dilation.

The hippocampus is your memory centre storing raw information from the senses, along with emotional baggage attached to the data by the amygdala.

Now we know these key parts, what happens when we are anxious, stressed or fearful?

Anxiety, stress and, of course, fear are triggered primarily through your senses:

Sight and sound are first processed by the thalamus, filtering incoming cues and sent directly to the amygdala or the cortex.

Smells and touch go directly to the amygdala, bypassing the thalamus altogether. (This is why smells often evoke powerful memories or feelings).

Any cues from your incoming senses that are associated with a threat in the amygdala (real or not, current or not) are immediately processed to trigger the fear response. This is the expressway. It happens before you consciously feel the fear.

The hippothalmus and pituitary gland cause the adrenal glands to pump out high levels of the stress hormone coritsol. Too much short circuits the cells of the hippocampus making it difficult to organize the memory of a trauma or stressful experience. Memories lose context and become fragmented.

The body's sympathetic nervous system shifts into overdrive causing the heart to beat faster, blood pressure to rise and the lungs hyperventilate. Perspiration increases and the skin's nerve endings tingle, causing goosebumps.

Your senses become hyper-alert, freezing you momentarily as you drink in every detail. Adrenaline floods to the muscles preparing you to fight or run away.

The brain shifts focus away from digestion to focus on potential dangers. Sometimes causing evacuation of the digestive tract thorough urination, defecation or vomiting. Heck, if you are about to be eaten as someone else's dinner why bother digesting your own?

Only after the fear response has been activated does the conscious mind kick in. Some sensory information, takes a more thoughtful route from the thalamus to the cortex. The cortex decides whether the sensory information warrants a fear response. If the fear is a genuine threat in space and time, the cortex signals the amygdala to continue being on alert.

Fear is a good, useful response essential to survival. However, anxiety is a fear of something that cannot be located in space and time.

Most often it is that indefinable something triggered initially by something real that you sense, that in itself is not threatening but it is associated with a fearful memory. And the bed nucleus of the stria terminals perpetuate the fear response. Anxiety is a real fear response for the individual feeling anxious. Anxiety can be debilitating for the sufferer.

Now that you know how anxiety happens in your brain, we can pay attention to how we can deliberately use our pre-frontal cortex to turn off an inappropriate anxiety response once a threat has passed.

Is Empathy any use?

pain

Are you brave enough to really get in touch with our own fragilities. We’ve all heard how we need to be more empathetic with others, to truly understand what it is like to walk a mile in their shoes. But what is it and is it actually any use? em·pa·thy “the intellectual identification with or vicarious experiencing of the feelings, thoughts, or attitudes of another.” Dictionary.com So what […]

Experience powerful results from a tool unlike any other.

Punctum uses colorful and stunning photos, life topics and powerful questions to create a playful atmosphere of learning and development.

The game plays on the relationship between photos, words and questions and how they relate to the players/team/clients regarding a specific personal or professional issue. Endless activities focus on creating a unique opportunity to pause for a moment, examine your perspective and explore new angles. In Punctum there are no winners or losers, no points and no competition.

With photo therapy principles guiding the selection of beautiful photos from amateur photographers around the world, each photo card is open to a world of interpretations. Spread them out face up/down or guide your client to select randomly. Watch as they interact and experience how these cards are a powerful reflective tool.

Music by the wonderful Tim McMorris

Photo cards, topics and concepts from Points of You – used with permission