Few things gain the appreciation of a top leader more quickly than an employee with a ‘whatever it takes’ attitude

  • Take the tough jobs.
    • The ability to accomplish difficult tasks earns others’ respect quickly.
  • Succeed with difficult people.
  • Put themselves on the line
  • Do more than expected
    • Typically, expectations are high at the top, low at the bottom and mixed in the middle.

Question: How do you maintain your “whatever it takes” attitude? You can leave a comment by clicking here.

One of the ways we teach leadership is through the game of golf. One of the reasons we use golf is because in the game of golf, it’s you and physics. Anything another player does has no impact on your game. It’s delightful, because, for many who join our golf advantage workshops, this is the first time that they will perform in front of everyone and be completely unable to blame anyone else.

  • One of the games we play is called red ball. At the beginning of the challenge, my golf pro’s give a red golf ball to a player in a foursome group, the person with the least golf experience. They don’t know why. But on the very last hole of the challenge, they learn that whatever everyone else has done during the round, now it’s only their score that counts.
  • Their group could have a brilliant scratch player or even three of them. But now the outcome for the team comes down to the person with the least experience.
  • Some red ball players relish the idea. Others just want to run away. This is truly about this idea.
  • The job is tough – there’s a lot of pressure and for this inexperienced player, it is tough period.
  • Their group mates might be helpful or difficult. Some might encourage and coach, others get exasperated and even angry when this inexperienced player fluffs a shot.
  • The red ball player is truly on the line. No-one can help now.
  • Those that relish it and have learned how to manage their mindset during the workshop… they do much more than even they expect.
  • Those that just want to run away… well this is their true character. They will never make good 360 leaders because they give in too easily.
 

The ONLY way to influence those above you is by connecting with them. Relationship skills define 360 leaders and separate them from other leaders. Remember, people won’t go along with you if they can’t get along with you.

Listen to your leader’s heartbeat.

  • Passion
  • Repetition
  • Mission
  • Request

Support your leader’s vision.

  • Promote your leaders dream and your leader will promote you.
  • Every time another person in the organization embraces the vision and passes it own, it’s like giving the vision “fresh legs”.

Question: How do you support your leader's vision when you don't agree with it? You can leave a comment by clicking here.

Earn your leader’s trust.

  • Trust is the foundation for every relationship
  • Remove trust for the relationship and that relationship is in trouble.

Question: How do you earn the trust of others? You can leave a comment by clicking here.

Learn to work with your leader’s weaknesses.

  • You cannot make someone feel important if you secretly feel he’s a nobody.
  • Whatever you believe and perceive about a person will be communicated.
  • In the same way, you cannot build a positive relationship with your boss if you disrespect them because of their weaknesses. Everyone has weak areas or blind spots, why not learn how to work with them?

I was running a mentoring workshop recently for a Singaporean organization with their senior leadership team. And I asked the Chief Executive if he would demonstrate with me at the front of the room and allow me to mentor him, in the workshop about his weaknesses.
He was a little shocked and confided that he couldn’t reveal his weaknesses to his team, as then they would know his weaknesses.
And I replied. “No, you’ve got it wrong, this isn’t a REVELATION moment. It’s a RELIEF moment. Your team isn’t going to saying ‘well I never knew that, who would have realized’, no they’ll be relieved. “Thank God, he knows. Nobody has to tell him.”

You see everyone has weak areas or blind spots. Showing your inner circle that you know and either you’re working on them or that you need help in these areas actually inspires people to follow you. When we look in the mirror it is always with rose tinted spectacles. We look for the good and if we don’t like what we see, we stop looking in the mirror. Other people though, they see us in all our non-reflected glory, warts and all. And for most people, we tend to focus on the negative. It’s easy to spot someone’s flaws.

Has anyone here had a leader who comes o them and asks: ”Please, tell me what you think my weaknesses are”. And you have a list ready to hand over. In fact, here’s a ream of them…

Understand that your leader has weaknesses. And remember that you have them also.

 

Sales and Storytelling With Craig Wortmann | Charu Sharma

What's your story?

I came across a job post for a director of sales role on a startup's website, and the required skills and experience section enlisted:

i) emotional intelligence,
ii) self-awareness,
iii) active listening,
iv) conflict resolution.

These are precisely the skills, along with storytelling, that I want to master at this stage of my career, and I am lucky to be in a sales position at LinkedIn. Learning to problem solve, deliver value and communicate effectively as a salesperson will greatly benefit me in any and every professional and personal pursuit in future.

I recently had the opportunity to meet with Craig Wortmann, a three-time star CEO, clinical professor of the award-winning Entrepreneurial Selling MBA course at Booth, and bestselling author of What's Your Story?, a book that looks at how leaders and sales professionals use stories to connect, engage and inspire. Just like my mentors and peers at LinkedIn, Craig advocates for transparency and authenticity while “selling,” and because I remain fascinated by the concepts of selling and storytelling, Craig generously let me pick his brain.

Many leaders and ‘serious' business people still seem to think that story-telling is for kids.
Somehow, many think that business is no place for stories. And, to illustrate their point, you know what they'll do. Yeap, that's right, they'll tell you a story.
Once you realise that story-telling is part and parcel of everyday, effective communications, you begin to use it. But then there's the stumbling block of the personal story.
Bringing your personal story into business is thought of as a ‘no go' zone. And you'd be wrong to think this.
This is an excellent Q&A with Craig Wortmann.

Curated from www.huffingtonpost.com

The Elevator Principle

  • Some people bring you up
  • Other people bring you down.

Everyone has someone in their lives who, when you see them, they just drain all your energy and enthusiasm for life. They are the energy VAMPIRES. The moment you spot them, you go ‘oh crikey, not them, what are they going to take this time?’ Duck or run, but if they spot you already…

How many of you have someone in your life that when you spot them you know they are just going to suck life right our of you?

How many of you are sat next to that person right now ?

If you are going to be a lead from the middle of the pack and influence people above you, you are going to have to be a load lifter.

How often you lift that load is going to determine the response form the leader above you

How to lift your leader’s load

  • Do your own job first.
    • I had a staff once who was really enthusiastic and always asking “How can I help you?” It was great at first and I thought how keen he was. Then later I realized that he wasn’t getting his own job done. So when he would come and ask me “How can I help you?” I responded, “You can help me by getting your own job done”. He didn’t really want to help me, he just wanted to be a pal, To be around me and learn. Well that’s great, but get your own job done first, OK?
  • When you find a problem, provide a solution.
    • Finding problems is not very impressive. It’s easy to find problems. Impress me, identify a problem and they have given some thought to it and propose a solution.
    • I had a boss in Saudi Arabia, another John, and his refrain to me as a young middle leader was “bring me solutions not problems”. And I learned to do just that. Whatever the problem I found, I would think of at least 3 solutions. And I went from suggesting the solutions to identifying which of the 3 was the best solution to saying here are some possible solutions, but this one is the best AND Can I do this? Now I was lifting the load.
  • Tell leaders what the need to hear, not what they want to hear.
    • This is not ‘venting’ what you want to say. Nor is it ‘kissing up’.
    • If you know something, it’s your duty to tell your leader.
    • It’s no use saying after the event. You know John I just knew that was the dumbest thing to do.
  • Stand up for your leader whenever you can.
    • Colin Powell – When we are debating an issue, loyalty means giving me your honest opinion, whether you think I’ll like it or not. Once a decision has been made, the debate ends, loyalty now means executing the decision as if it were your own.
  • Ask your leader how you can lift their load.

 

 

Articles of Faith: Leadership, Legacy and Grasping the Wind | Linked 2 Leadership

 

Guard your heart above all else, for it determines the course of your life. Proverbs 4:23, NLT

A month ago I finally began to appreciate this proverb. A month ago, I died and was rudely shocked back to the operating table by a wonderful team of well-meaning surgeons. How were they to know that I was thoroughly enjoying the total peace and joy of having truly let go?

Then I observed that most people are motivated to success because they envy their neighbors. But this, too, is meaningless–like chasing the wind. NIV Ecclesiastes 4:4

It took a heart attack and an all too brief visit to heaven for me to accept that anything I have been doing on this earth is no more than a striving after the wind.

Curated from linked2leadership.com

It is my honour and privilege to have been asked by Tom Schulte at Linked 2 Leadership to write a piece for the Sunday Articles of Faith series.

In today's world of 9-second attention spans, our introductions mean more-than-ever before. Sally Hogshead reveals the seven triggers of fascination and how to get others to fall in love with your ideas, instantly.

What’s Better Today? How to Grow and Learn into the Leader You Can Be

What’s Better Today? How to Grow and Learn into the Leader You Can Be. (Singapore: Corporate Edge Asia Pte Ltd, 2013)

Leadership Coaching is an essential tool for anyone who wants to learn and grow as a leader, improve their business leadership coaching skills or to learn to coach. Written by a top leadership coach trainer, “What's Better Today? How to Grow and Learn into the Leader You Can Be” is filled with practical coaching tools and template exercises that bring professional coaching techniques within your grasp.

This book helps and guides you in getting the most our of your own coach and coaching because, for most people, being coached is a new experience.

  • In Part One, “Starting Out” – you will learn if you are ready to be coached and establishing your coaching objectives, and if so, what coaching style will work best for you right now and thus how you can go about choosing a coach to work with.
  • In Part Two, “Grow and Learn” – you’ll learn how to get the very most you can out of your coaching program. Including a structured growth framework with easy to use templates that you can use to both shortcut your coaching and get the results you want as quickly as you want.
  • Part Three, is about “Wrapping Up” your coaching effectively so that you, and your coach, continue to learn from the experience.

Leadership coaching is a great introduction to a powerful way of helping others grow.

I was directed to this book by a friend who knew I had had a less than satisfactory experience with a coach. This book clearly and concisely gave me all the information I wish I had had earlier. I would recommend this book for anyone thinking about taking on the commitment required to have a coach – and for coaches to see what is really expected of them!Neil Davidson
The Economist Guide to Financial Management

The Economist Guide to Financial Management (2nd Ed): Principles and practice (Economist Books) (London: The Economist, 2014)

The most straightforward and easily understood book on finance.

John Tennent clearly explains the underlying foundations of managing finance, simply. With plenty of examples to help you grasp the concept and mini case studies of how to read the accounts of listed companies.

Thi book will help you demystify finance and be able to red a balance sheet, income statement and truly understand the critical importance of cash.

Recognizing employees is one of the most overlooked facets of managements that even great leaders sometimes forget about.

Without a good employee recognition strategy, people will feel unappreciated and build up stress.

In fact,

The last thing you want is to have high employee turnover because of poor employee recognition.

Here are some incredible statistics about employee recognition:

Question: Do you think this is right for where you work? You can leave a comment by clicking here.

This infographic was crafted with love by Officevibe, the employee engagement platform that helps managers see the ROI of employee recognition while making employees happier.

 

While interviewing the legendary Jack Nicklaus, a reporter once remarked, “Jack, you have had a spectacular career. Your name is synonymous with the game of golf. You really know your way around the course. What is your secret?” Nicklaus replied, “The holes are numbered!”

Professional Leadership Caddy

Jim Clemmer
Jim Clemmer