Leading Mindfully | ELAvate! Leaders Blog

People will never forget how you made them feel. People will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”, Mindful #leadership is being sensitive to the sentiments of those we lead., We often focus on doing leadership, when our actual focus should be […]

8 Subconscious Mistakes Our Brains Make Every Day–And How To Avoid Them | Fast Company | Business + Innovation

If you really think you are in charge of you, then why are you doing these? Get ready to have your mind blown. I was seriously shocked at some of these mistakes in thinking that I subconsciously make all the time. Obviously, none of them are huge, life-threatening mistakes, but they are really surprising and […]

Leadership Styles around the world - according to Brighton School of Business and Management.

According to Brighton School of Business and Management – an infographic representing the leadership styles around the world.

I find it fascinating that they consider differences in style across Scandinavia, for example, and yet East Asia gets lumped into one style.

Question: What do you think? Do “many East Asian” countries exhibit a Confucian leadership style? You can leave a comment by clicking here.

 

TanveerNaseer.com » Understanding The Value Of Charisma In Leadership

Has charisma gone out of fashion, or are we simply too busy? To begin, let us first understand that charisma is not simply about having this natural charm or a magnetic aura that some of us seem to naturally possess to draw in those around us. Rather, as the Oxford Dictionary points out, charisma refers […]

employee-recognition-infographic-officevibe[1]

Recognizing employees is one of the most overlooked facets of managements that even great leaders sometimes forget about.

Without a good employee recognition strategy, people will feel unappreciated and build up stress.

In fact,

The last thing you want is to have high employee turnover because of poor employee recognition.

Here are some incredible statistics about employee recognition:

Question: Do you think this is right for where you work? You can leave a comment by clicking here.

This infographic was crafted with love by Officevibe, the employee engagement platform that helps managers see the ROI of employee recognition while making employees happier.

 

While interviewing the legendary Jack Nicklaus, a reporter once remarked, “Jack, you have had a spectacular career. Your name is synonymous with the game of golf. You really know your way around the course. What is your secret?” Nicklaus replied, “The holes are numbered!”

Professional Leadership Caddy

Jim Clemmer
Jim Clemmer

The Secret to Hiring: It Starts Before You Post the Position | Inc.com

Do you really know who you seek? Before you scope for a new hire, make sure you know exactly what it is you’re looking for. Nathaniel Koloc, CEO of Rework shares the lowdown on the effective preparation that goes into successful hiring, including: Recognize Your Reason for hiring at all now Define the “Commander’s Intent” […]

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Stress and Anxiety hold us back from achieving all that we can – to win this war, we need to understand just what is happening inside our brains and then we can go beyond coping and choose to lead our lives towards good success.

your brain on stress and anxiety infographic

Stress and Anxiety in your – inforgraphic. Click to get the full image to download

Stress is the way our bodies and minds react to something which upsets our normal balance in life. Stress is how we feel and how our bodies react when we are fearful or anxious. Some level of stress has some upside to mind and body function to enable us to react in a positive way. Too much stress though, is both harmful to the body and our performance. How much is too much? Well, that depends… on you and how you respond.

It is essential to know how our brain responds to the stimuli which trigger an anxiety response so that you are equipped to deal appropriately with anxiety.

Let me highlight the key areas of your brain that are involved, and then I will explain what happens inside the brain.

The Thalamus is the central hub for sights and sounds. The thalamus breaks down incoming visual cues by size, shape and colour, and auditory cues by volume and dissonance, and then signals the cortex.

The cortex then gives raw sights and sounds meaning enabling you to be conscious of what you are seeing and hearing. And I’ll mention here that the prefrontal cortex is vital to turning off the anxiety response once the threat has passed.

The amygdala is the emotional core of the brain whose primary role is to trigger the fear response. Information passing through the amygdala is associated with an emotional significance.

The bed nucleus of the stria terminals is particularly interesting when we discuss anxiety. While the amygdala sets off an immediate burst of fear whilst the BNST perpetuates the fear response, causing longer term unease typical of anxiety.

The locus ceruleus receives signals from the amygdala and initiates the classic anxiety response: rapid heartbeat, increased blood pressure, sweating and pupil dilation.

The hippocampus is your memory centre storing raw information from the senses, along with emotional baggage attached to the data by the amygdala.

Now we know these key parts, what happens when we are anxious, stressed or fearful?

Anxiety, stress and, of course, fear are triggered primarily through your senses:

Sight and sound are first processed by the thalamus, filtering incoming cues and sent directly to the amygdala or the cortex.

Smells and touch go directly to the amygdala, bypassing the thalamus altogether. (This is why smells often evoke powerful memories or feelings).

Any cues from your incoming senses that are associated with a threat in the amygdala (real or not, current or not) are immediately processed to trigger the fear response. This is the expressway. It happens before you consciously feel the fear.

The hippothalmus and pituitary gland cause the adrenal glands to pump out high levels of the stress hormone coritsol. Too much short circuits the cells of the hippocampus making it difficult to organize the memory of a trauma or stressful experience. Memories lose context and become fragmented.

The body’s sympathetic nervous system shifts into overdrive causing the heart to beat faster, blood pressure to rise and the lungs hyperventilate. Perspiration increases and the skin’s nerve endings tingle, causing goosebumps.

Your senses become hyper-alert, freezing you momentarily as you drink in every detail. Adrenaline floods to the muscles preparing you to fight or run away.

The brain shifts focus away from digestion to focus on potential dangers. Sometimes causing evacuation of the digestive tract thorough urination, defecation or vomiting. Heck, if you are about to be eaten as someone else’s dinner why bother digesting your own?

Only after the fear response has been activated does the conscious mind kick in. Some sensory information, takes a more thoughtful route from the thalamus to the cortex. The cortex decides whether the sensory information warrants a fear response. If the fear is a genuine threat in space and time, the cortex signals the amygdala to continue being on alert.

Fear is a good, useful response essential to survival. However, anxiety is a fear of something that cannot be located in space and time.

Most often it is that indefinable something triggered initially by something real that you sense, that in itself is not threatening but it is associated with a fearful memory. And the bed nucleus of the stria terminals perpetuate the fear response. Anxiety is a real fear response for the individual feeling anxious. Anxiety can be debilitating for the sufferer.

Now that you know how anxiety happens in your brain, we can pay attention to how we can deliberately use our pre-frontal cortex to turn off an inappropriate anxiety response once a threat has passed.

Leadership Congruence: Do You Walk the Talk? | Linked 2 Leadership

Does your boss walk his or her talk? Do you? Sometime’s ‘walk your talk’ is a little bit of a trite phrase, as is its cousin “practice what you preach’. Incongruence though creates distrust and disagreement, according to Patrick Veroneau, CEO of Emery #leadership Group. A foundational behavior in effective leadership requires demonstrating congruence between what one […]

Leadership Congruence: Do You Walk the Talk? | Linked 2 Leadership

Is hiding your own backstory holding you back? The Don Draper Problem: Root Out Your False Narratives | Michael Port

We’ve all sat through a speech or job interview and thought “something is off here” with your speaker or counterpart, “I’m not feeling comfortable.” We’ve seen what goes wrong when someone has been promoted and exaggerates their accomplishments to impress new colleagues. We regularly read stories about highly qualified applicants for head #coach or executive […]