Aptitude + Attitude = Altitude

Technical aptitude alone is insufficient Jimmy Connors, winner of 109 professional singles tennis titles says “There’s a thin line between being #1 or #100 and mostly it’s mental.” In his well-researched book, Emotional Intelligence, Daniel Goleman shows that it’s our attitude more than our aptitude that determines our altitude. Whilst our society lauds intellectual giants […]

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The Real War for Talent

The war is not to find talent; it’s to use the talent you have already. The search for talent is ongoing. Individuals seek to develop their talents, companies seek to identify talent and retain it, succession planning requires it, politicians plan for it, and the world wants to find it. But what is it? I […]

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Why my clients are my heroes

You make the stuff you sell to provide homes for families, the best education for well-fed kids, circulating your income back into society to provide more jobs and tax dollars that help pay for hospitals and looking after the less well-off. Our hero has a problem Many people get reasonable performance reviews yet fail to […]

my clients are my heores

Leadership Qualities – what makes a good leader? Are they born or made? How do I develop these qualities?

Developing the leadership qualities necessary for success is possible! Some people will debate for hours on whether a leader is born or made? Is leadership and management the same thing? Is one particular personality type more or less likely to succeed as a leader? For every question you have about leadership there are a hundred […]

Quality Leadership

Motivation Direction

Many successful golf players (and business leaders) are motivated by their own dissatisfaction with their performance. It can be a very powerful motivator. You would expect someone who is thus motivated to improve their game to be similarly motivated in other aspects of their life. Do you see a golf course as a series of […]

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What is a successful leader? | success

What is a successful leader? Because our GAPPS5 report profile benchmarks against “Successful” leaders I get asked this a lot. And it is a great question! Because success means different things to different people. For some, success is a mansion on the beachfront, for some it’s being in charge of a large multi-national, for others, […]

Success

Few things gain the appreciation of a top leader more quickly than an employee with a ‘whatever it takes’ attitude

  • Take the tough jobs.
    • The ability to accomplish difficult tasks earns others’ respect quickly.
  • Succeed with difficult people.
  • Put themselves on the line
  • Do more than expected
    • Typically, expectations are high at the top, low at the bottom and mixed in the middle.

Question: How do you maintain your “whatever it takes” attitude? You can leave a comment by clicking here.

One of the ways we teach leadership is through the game of golf. One of the reasons we use golf is because in the game of golf, it’s you and physics. Anything another player does has no impact on your game. It’s delightful, because, for many who join our golf advantage workshops, this is the first time that they will perform in front of everyone and be completely unable to blame anyone else.

  • One of the games we play is called red ball. At the beginning of the challenge, my golf pro’s give a red golf ball to a player in a foursome group, the person with the least golf experience. They don’t know why. But on the very last hole of the challenge, they learn that whatever everyone else has done during the round, now it’s only their score that counts.
  • Their group could have a brilliant scratch player or even three of them. But now the outcome for the team comes down to the person with the least experience.
  • Some red ball players relish the idea. Others just want to run away. This is truly about this idea.
  • The job is tough – there’s a lot of pressure and for this inexperienced player, it is tough period.
  • Their group mates might be helpful or difficult. Some might encourage and coach, others get exasperated and even angry when this inexperienced player fluffs a shot.
  • The red ball player is truly on the line. No-one can help now.
  • Those that relish it and have learned how to manage their mindset during the workshop… they do much more than even they expect.
  • Those that just want to run away… well this is their true character. They will never make good 360 leaders because they give in too easily.

The Great Delusions of Networking

The great delusions of Networking M. Scott Peck in ‘the road less travelled’ starts: “Life is difficult”. What is most surprising, is that, for many people, this is a revelation! Go to any business networking event, or meet a potential client – especially during the current economic situation and they will be moaning incessantly about […]

 

The ONLY way to influence those above you is by connecting with them. Relationship skills define 360 leaders and separate them from other leaders. Remember, people won’t go along with you if they can’t get along with you.

Listen to your leader’s heartbeat.

  • Passion
  • Repetition
  • Mission
  • Request

Support your leader’s vision.

  • Promote your leaders dream and your leader will promote you.
  • Every time another person in the organization embraces the vision and passes it own, it’s like giving the vision “fresh legs”.

Question: How do you support your leader’s vision when you don’t agree with it? You can leave a comment by clicking here.

Earn your leader’s trust.

  • Trust is the foundation for every relationship
  • Remove trust for the relationship and that relationship is in trouble.

Question: How do you earn the trust of others? You can leave a comment by clicking here.

Learn to work with your leader’s weaknesses.

  • You cannot make someone feel important if you secretly feel he’s a nobody.
  • Whatever you believe and perceive about a person will be communicated.
  • In the same way, you cannot build a positive relationship with your boss if you disrespect them because of their weaknesses. Everyone has weak areas or blind spots, why not learn how to work with them?

I was running a mentoring workshop recently for a Singaporean organization with their senior leadership team. And I asked the Chief Executive if he would demonstrate with me at the front of the room and allow me to mentor him, in the workshop about his weaknesses.
He was a little shocked and confided that he couldn’t reveal his weaknesses to his team, as then they would know his weaknesses.
And I replied. “No, you’ve got it wrong, this isn’t a REVELATION moment. It’s a RELIEF moment. Your team isn’t going to saying ‘well I never knew that, who would have realized’, no they’ll be relieved. “Thank God, he knows. Nobody has to tell him.”

You see everyone has weak areas or blind spots. Showing your inner circle that you know and either you’re working on them or that you need help in these areas actually inspires people to follow you. When we look in the mirror it is always with rose tinted spectacles. We look for the good and if we don’t like what we see, we stop looking in the mirror. Other people though, they see us in all our non-reflected glory, warts and all. And for most people, we tend to focus on the negative. It’s easy to spot someone’s flaws.

Has anyone here had a leader who comes o them and asks: ”Please, tell me what you think my weaknesses are”. And you have a list ready to hand over. In fact, here’s a ream of them…

Understand that your leader has weaknesses. And remember that you have them also.

 

Sales and Storytelling With Craig Wortmann | Charu Sharma

What’s your story?

I came across a job post for a director of sales role on a startup’s website, and the required skills and experience section enlisted:

i) emotional intelligence,
ii) self-awareness,
iii) active listening,
iv) conflict resolution.

These are precisely the skills, along with storytelling, that I want to master at this stage of my career, and I am lucky to be in a sales position at LinkedIn. Learning to problem solve, deliver value and communicate effectively as a salesperson will greatly benefit me in any and every professional and personal pursuit in future.

I recently had the opportunity to meet with Craig Wortmann, a three-time star CEO, clinical professor of the award-winning Entrepreneurial Selling MBA course at Booth, and bestselling author of What’s Your Story?, a book that looks at how leaders and sales professionals use stories to connect, engage and inspire. Just like my mentors and peers at LinkedIn, Craig advocates for transparency and authenticity while “selling,” and because I remain fascinated by the concepts of selling and storytelling, Craig generously let me pick his brain.

Many leaders and ‘serious’ business people still seem to think that story-telling is for kids.
Somehow, many think that business is no place for stories. And, to illustrate their point, you know what they’ll do. Yeap, that’s right, they’ll tell you a story.
Once you realise that story-telling is part and parcel of everyday, effective communications, you begin to use it. But then there’s the stumbling block of the personal story.
Bringing your personal story into business is thought of as a ‘no go’ zone. And you’d be wrong to think this.
This is an excellent Q&A with Craig Wortmann.

Curated from www.huffingtonpost.com